Couscous with Olives and Garbanzo Beans

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in an effort to hang on to the last vestiges of summer, i’ve been trying to cook as much ‘fresh’ food as possible before all the good produce dissapears from the markets for the year. so i made greek and caribbean food:

they were gooey
cheese and sun-dried tomato phyllo rolls

okay, this was delicious
couscous with olives and garbanzo beans

the habaneros made my mouth tingle and burn
hot pepper shrimp

i substituted basmati rice and i ran out of cumin
cuban red beans and rice

something went terribly wrong in my recipe here
ginger beer

here’s the recipe for the couscous:

1 14-oz can low-sodium chicken broth
1 10-oz box couscous
1 cup dry garbanzo beans, soaked overnight, cooked, and drained (or substitute 1 can garbanzo beans)
1/2 cup chopped red onion
1/2 cup chopped kalamata olives
1/2 cup chopped fresh parsley
4 T fresh lemon juice
1 t grated lemon peel

1. bring broth to boil in medium saucepan over medium-high heat. stir in couscous; cook 30 seconds. remove from heat; cover and let stand 5 minutes.
2. fluff couscous with fork. mix in garbanzo beans and remaining 5 ingredients. season with salt and pepper.

Tofu Pouch Treasure Boats

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okay, so i cook too much east asian food. i don’t seem to tire of it though. here’s the japanese dishes i’ve been cooking:

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tofu pouch treasure boats

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omusubi (hand-pressed rice with mushroom-kelp and pickled plum fillings). they tasted just like the ones i had in honolulu!

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bite-sized chicken tonkatsu. these didn’t turn out so good.

here’s the recipe for the treasure boats:

2 ribbons kampyo, soaked in warm water
1/4 t coarse salt
6 oz shirataki noodles, drained and coarsely chopped
8 fried tofu slices (aburage)
1 T hijiki, soaked in warm water
3 fresh shiitake mushrooms, thily sliced
1/2 carrot, finely shredded
2 T shelled green peas
1 cup sea stock (made by soaking 10 inches kelp in warm water for 15 minutes, then slowly brin to a simmer, remove from heat, add 3 tablespoons katsuo-bushi and let sit for 3 minutes, then strain)
1 T sake
2 t sugar
1 1/2 T soy sauce

1. remove the kampyo from the water and squeeze out excess liquid. rub with salt, kneading the ribbons until soft, about 30 seconds. bring a small pot of water to a boil, add the kampyo, and blanch for 30 seconds. drain.
2. cut each tofu slice across in half and pry open each half to make a square pouch.
3. in a bowl, combine the softened hijiki, shirataki noodles, mushroom, carrot, and peas. stuff each pouch with a portion of the vegetable mixture. close by pressing down on one open edge, tucking it in to enclose the filling. roll the stuffed tofu over so the ‘seam’ is on the bottom.
4. tie a kampyo ribbon around the tofu pouch, making a knot on top. snip the ribbon and repeat with the remaining pouches.
5. in a wide, shallow pot, combine the stock, sake, and sugar and bring to a boil over high heat. adjust the heat to maintain a simmer and add the pouches, seam side down. simmer the pouches for about 10 minutes. then add the soy sauce and simmer for a final 2 minutes.
6. to serve, place the pouches on a plate and spoon the remaining broth over the pouches to moisten. serve warm.

Hot and Sour Egg Flower Soup

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everyone says i cook too much east asian food. i guess its true, but i never tire of it. i mean, there’s so much to discover. and this of course includes chinese food. these are adapted from martin yan recipes:

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sichuan spicy noodle salad

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macanese steak with mushrooms

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hot and sour egg flower soup

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hakka shrimp-stuffed eggplant with black bean sauce

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gum-lo wontons with seafood sweet and sour sauce

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fujian fried rice

here’s the recipe for the soup:

3 dried black mushrooms
1 dried wood ear mushroom
2 ounces dried bean thread noodles
4 cups chicken broth
1/4 cup carrot, sliced thinly
1/2 package medium tofu, cut into 1/2-inch dice
3 tablespoons white vinegar
3 tablespoons soy sauce
1 tablespoon chili garlic sauce
2 teaspoons sugar
1 tablespoon cornstarch, drissolved in 2 tablespoons water
1 egg, lightly beaten
1 green onion, sliced thinly

1. soak mushrooms with warm water until soft, about 20 minutes. drain and slice thinly.
2. soak noodles with warm water until soft, about 10 minutes. drain and cut into four-inch lengths.
3. bring the chicken broth to a boil in a large saucepan. stir in the mushrooms and carrot, simmering for about 2 minutes.
4. stir in the noodles, tofu, vinegar, soy sauce, chili garlic sauce, and sugar. simmer for about 2 minutes. pour in the dissolved cornstarch and cook, stirring, until the soup boils and thickens, about 1 minute. slowly pour in the egg, stirring the soup to create “egg flowers.”
5. ladle the soup into bowls and garnish with green onions.

Pickled Red Radishes

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i’m a little late on the persian new year wishes, but happy noruz nevertheless! i’ve been so busy this week that i’ve neglected my blog (again).

but i have been cooking:

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chilled udon noodle salad

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wakame and turkey potstickers

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tofu-stuffed shiitake mushrooms

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soy-simmered soybeans with vegetables

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picked red radishes

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chicken donburi

my weekend involved vietamese egg noodle soup, a spike lee movie, a number of bookstores, a whole lot of traffic, and a silly attempt at wardrobe modifications. i relished it all. after all, its not every week that i get to see the boy four days in a row.

Here’s the recipe for the radish pickles:

10-15 red radishes, trimmed
1 1/4 teaspoon coarse salt
1/2 cup rice vinegar
2 tablespoons sugar
1 one-inch piece kombu (kelp) seaweed

1. Combine the vinegar, sugar, 1/4 teaspoon salt and kombu in a small saucepan and let the kombu soak for at least 20 minutes. Place the pan over low heat and stir to dissolve the sugar and salt. Slowly bring to just below a boil and cook until the sugar and salt have completely dissolved. Remove from heat and let the sauce cool in the pan.

2. In the meantime, slice each radish into quarters. Place the radish pieces in a bowl and sprinkle with remaining teaspoon salt. Allow the radishes to sit undisturbed for about five minutes. Gently toss and squeeze to wilt the radishes. Pour off any accumulated liquid and rinse the wilted radishes briefly under cold water to remove excess salt. Squeeze again.

3. Place the radishes in a glass jar and pour the cooled sauce over them, setting the kombu piece on top. Cover with plastic wrap and a tight-fitting lid. Let the radishes stand at least 30 minutes at room temperature and up to one day. After one day, refrigerate the radishes. The radishes will keep in a tightly covered jar in the refrigerator for several weeks.

Spicy Chinese Eggplant

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while its been pouring buckets outside, i’ve been inside cooking. (well i’ve been outside too, but that’s another story.) the theme this time was chinese.

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shandong stir-fry soup noodles

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spicy eggplant

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sizzling singapore chili shrimp

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chinatown roast duck

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daikon with bean thread noodles

here’s the recipe for the eggplant:

1/3 cup chicken broth
1 T hoisin sauce
2 t soy sauce
2 t lemon juice
1 t plum sauce
4 chinese eggplants (1 lb)
vegetable oil
2 t minced garlic
1 t minced ginger
1/2 jalapeno chili, sliced into thin rings
basil leaves
sliced green onions

1. prepare the sauce: stir the chicken broth, hoisin sauce, soy sauce, lemon juice, and plum sauce in a bowl until blended.
2. cut the stems from the eggplants, then cut them lengthwise into quarters, then cut crosswise into 3-inch pieces.
3. pour enough oil into a large saucepan to come to a depth of 2 inches. heat over medium-high heat and deep-fry the eggplant until tender. remove and drain on paper towels.
4. heat a wok over high heat until hot. add 1 tablespoon of oil and the garlic, ginger, and chili and stir-fry until fragrant, about 20 seconds. add the sauce and bring to a simmer.
5. add the eggplant and stir to coat. scoop onto a serving platter and garnish with basil leaves and green onions.