Hot and Spicy Numbing Chicken

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If you don’t like spicy food, please keep scrolling. The warning is in the name of the dish here: it is hot and it is spicy and thanks to a generous sprinkling of Sichuan peppercorns, it is numbing. But in an oh-so-good way.

Adapted from a Fuchsia Dunlop recipe, this Sichuan-style appetizer is perfect for making ahead of time since you start with already cooked chicken and the final dish is served at room temperature. Make sure you use good quality chili oil here, preferably homemade. It makes all the difference.

Hot and spicy numbing chicken

Ingredients:

1 pound cooked chicken breast
2 green onions
2 teaspoons sugar
3 teaspoons soy sauce
3 tablespoons chili oil with chili flakes
2 teaspoons sesame oil
1/2 teaspoon ground roasted Sichuan pepper

1. Cut the chicken evenly into slices and set aside. Thinly slice the green onions diagonally, 1 1/2 inches long.

2. In a small bowl, stir together the sugar, soy sauce, chili oil, and sesame oil.

3. Place the green onions on a serving platter and then add the chicken. Sprinkle the chicken with the ground Sichuan pepper and drizzle with the sauce. Serve at room temperature.

Rice Salad with Soppressata and Mozzarella

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This summery rice salad is practically begging to be taken to a picnic. Studded with cheese, olives, fennel, peas, and soppressata, it’s salty and savory and and makes a perfect side dish in warm weather. This dish has strong Italian vibes but I used basmati rice instead of the more typical arborio because hello, I’m Persian.

Rice salad with soppressata and mozzarella

Ingredients:

1 1/2 cups basmati rice (10 ounces)

1 1/2 cups thawed frozen peas

3 tablespoons red wine vinegar
2 cups cubed mozzarella cheese (5 ounces)

4 ounces thinly sliced soppressata, 
sliced into 1/2-inch strips

1 cup pitted Castelvetrano olives, halved 

1 small fennel bulb, halved lengthwise, cored and very thinly sliced
2 green onions, thinly sliced

1/3 cup parsley leaves

1/4 cup olive oil

salt
pepper

1. In a medium saucepan of salted boiling water, cook the rice over moderate heat until al dente, about 15 minutes. Just before draining, add the peas and cook for 1 minute. Drain the rice and peas well and add to a large bowl. Drizzle the vinegar over the rice and peas, toss, and let cool slightly, about 15 minutes.


2. Add the cheese, soppressata, olives, fennel, green onions and parsley to the rice and peas and toss. Drizzle with the olive oil and more vinegar, if desired. Season with salt and pepper and toss again. Serve at room temperature.

Charred Shishito Peppers with Furikake

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♪ It’s the most wonderful time of the year ♪: shishito season. Come summertime, I am all about putting shishitos in everything: in salad, in stir-fries, and simply by themselves. I usually give them a quick toss in a miso sauce after blistering them on the stovetop, but this quick and easy version inflected with lime and furikake is one of my new favorites. It’s the perfect summer app and comes together in about ten minutes.

Charred shishito peppers with furikake

Ingredients:

2 teaspoons olive oil

1 pound shishito peppers
2 teaspoons furikake, plus more for garnish

Juice of 1/2 to 1 lime
1 teaspoon soy sauce

salt

1. In a large skillet, heat 1 teaspoon of the oil. Add half of the peppers and cook over moderately high heat, turning occasionally, until charred and tender, about 4 minutes. Transfer to a bowl. Repeat with the remaining oil and peppers. 


2. Add the furikake, the lime juice and soy sauce to the shishitos and toss to combine; season with salt. Transfer to a seving plate and garnish with more furikake.

Iranian Okra Stew (Khoresh-e Bamieh)

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For the uninitiated, khoresh is a general term for stews and curries in Iranian cuisine that are served alongside basmati rice, fresh sabzi (herbs), and torshi (pickled vegetables). From eggplant to fenugreek to split peas to pomegranates, there are countless varieties of khoresh and at gatherings you’ll see at least two types served alongside other dishes.

My favorite khoresh, though, is a less common one: khoresh-e bamieh. This okra stew hails from southern Iran and although both of my parents are from Tehran, my mom’s family grew up eating this. She introduced it to my dad when they were married, who counts it among his favorites too. And me? Well, I go crazy for this stuff. Luckily for me (and you), it’s easy to make. It’s not quite as good as my mom’s, but I’m getting there.

Like most khoreshs, it can be made vegetarian by simply omitting the meat. You can also substitute the chicken for leg of lamb that’s been cut into 2-inch cubes. Just be sure to adjust the cooking time and water accordingly.

Khoresh-e bamieh

Ingredients:

2 onions, peeled and chopped
6 cloves garlic, peeled and crushed
2 pounds skinless chicken legs and thighs
3 tablespoons olive oil
1 teaspoon salt
1/2 teaspoon pepper
1 teaspoon turmeric
3 tablespoons tomato paste
1 tomato, chopped
juice of 1 lime
1 pound fresh or frozen okra

1. In a large heavy pot or Dutch oven, brown onion, garlic, and chicken in the olive oil. Sprinkle with salt, pepper, and turmeric. Add the tomato paste and tomato. Pour in 1 1/2 cups water, cover, and simmer over low heat for 1/2 hour until the chicken is tender, stirring occasionally.

2. When the chicken is tender, add lime juice and okra. Simmer, covered, for 15 to 20 minutes over low heat. Check to see if okra is tender. Taste the stew and adjust the seasoning if needed. Serve warm with chelo (Iranian-style rice).

Miso Banana Bread

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Welcome to your new favorite banana bread recipe. Contrary to what you might be thinking, no, you can’t taste the miso in the final product here. Instead, it’s like someone took banana bread and amped up the taste, resulting in this deeply flavorful, showstopping treat. I’ve adapted this recipe from the original in Food & Wine, and my version is on regular rotation this days in casa yogurtsoda.

Miso banana bread

Ingredients:

5 overripe bananas
1 1/2 cups flour
3/4 teaspoon baking soda
1/4 teaspoon baking powder
1/4 teaspoon kosher salt
3/4 stick unsalted butter, softened
3/4 cup sugar
1/4 cup white miso
1/3 cup buttermilk
2 eggs

1. Preheat the oven to 350F degrees. Butter and flour a 8 1/2-by-4 1/2-inch metal loaf pan. In a bowl, using 
a fork, mash 4 of the bananas until chunky. In another bowl, whisk the flour, baking soda, baking powder and salt.

2. Using a stand mixer fitted with the paddle, mix the butter, sugar and miso at medium speed until fluffy, about 5 minutes. At low speed, slowly add the buttermilk, then beat in 
the eggs 1 at a time until incorporated. Beat in the mashed bananas; the batter will look curdled. Add the dry ingredients and mix until blended. Scrape into the prepared pan.

3. Slice the remaining banana lengthwise and arrange the halves on top of the batter side by side, cut side up. Bake for 
1 hour and 20 minutes. Let the bread cool for 30 minutes before turning out to cool completely.